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The taxonomy of this genus continues to be a topic of study as new species are named or long-standing ones reassigned to other genera.

BOETHIUS' DE INSTITUTIONE MUSICA : A HANDLIST OF MANUSCRIPTS Dedicated to Michel Huglo on his 65th birthday The handlist offered in these pages is intended to serve as a prolegomenon for future historical and textual study of Boethius' De institutione musica.

Such study requires a thorough of the extant codices, and this handlist represents an intermediate step toward that goal.

The thoroughness of his approach is obviously out of place in a list as abbreviated as this, and complete codicological descriptions and detailed analyses of contents must await a future catalog and monograph treating the history of the text.

-nə-don; meaning "iguana-tooth") is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur that existed roughly halfway between the first of the swift bipedal hypsilophodontids of the mid-Jurassic and the duck-billed dinosaurs of the late Cretaceous.

While many species have been classified in the genus Iguanodon, dating from the late Jurassic Period to the early Cretaceous Period of Asia, Europe, and North America, research in the first decade of the 21st century suggests that there is only one well-substantiated species: I.

bernissartensis, which lived from the late Barremian to the earliest Aptian ages (Early Cretaceous) in Belgium, Spain, and possibly elsewhere in Europe, between about 126 and 125 million years ago. Distinctive features include large thumb spikes, which were possibly used for defense against predators, combined with long prehensile fifth fingers able to forage for food.

Emboldened nevertheless, Mantell again sent some teeth to Cuvier, who answered on 22 June 1824 that he had determined that they were reptilian and quite possibly belonged to a giant herbivore.

In a new edition that year of his Recherches sur les Ossemens Fossiles Cuvier admitted his earlier mistake, leading to an immediate acceptance of Mantell, and his new saurian, in scientific circles.

The genus was named in 1825 by English geologist Gideon Mantell but discovered by William Harding Bensted, based on fossil specimens that are now assigned to Therosaurus and Mantellodon.

Iguanodon was the second type of dinosaur formally named based on fossil specimens, after Megalosaurus.

The list is limited to sources compiled before about 1500 and does not report manuscripts or studies of the text dating after the turn of the 16th century.